Monday, June 24, 2013

Andrew Loomis's Informal Subdivision Page Design




I'm currently studying Andrew Loomis's "Creative Illustration" book. HIs other books which I've studied —Fun with a Pencil, Drawing the Head and Hands and Successful Drawing—have all contained so much helpful instruction that I've become a bit of a Loomis disciple.

As I explained in this post about Loomis's method for drawing the figure in perspective, his methods are sound despite his illustrations being sometimes convoluted.

But when I came across these pages in Creative Illustration, I had to actually question the method:


The first page shows formal subdivision design. OK, that's clear. The second page shows his informal subdivision method which is where he loses me. I tried it with a ruler and pencil yet every time I got even divisions! At first I thought I didn't follow the instructions correctly but after four tries I realized that it simply doesn't work. All of Loomis's examples show uneven, random divisions while all of my tries were even or symmetrical in some way.

Does Loomis's informal subdivision method work for you?

8 comments:

  1. His work on composition using organic lines is equally unique and interesting... Just discovered him today and like you I will be trying to better understand his approach...

    russpears@hotmail.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agreed. Loomis's approaches and explanations can sometimes be difficult but I think they're worth learning. Thanks for the comment!

      Delete
  2. Seems to work ok here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hDiNJ-5u0uU

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it does work in this helpful demo. Thank you for posting it. There still appears to my eye, however, to be more asymmetry and randomness to Loomis's diagram than both this video and my own attempts. That could be simply a matter of skill and/or experience. Thanks again for the link!

      Delete
  3. I find it to be very helpful and didn't have any problems using it. In fact, I found it to be a brilliant method for compositional problem solving.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your comment. I either made a mistake or was expecting different results. But as you said, it is definitely a helpful method for compositional layout.

      Delete
  4. The method works for me too, the thing is that (as Loomis describes in the pages you uploaded here) you should not place the verticals and horizontals on places like 1/4 or 1/3 or 1/2. If you do this, you end up with something that is asymmetrical and organic. What you also should do, is not making a cross with your diagonals. If you read the pages again you'll see it explained further. These two things really help making your composition pleasing to the eye and not symmetrical. I hope this helps, because if done right, this method is wonderful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the comment! I think you're right. I have to be more aware of where I position the original lines. I'll keep working at it!

      Delete